5 Reasons to Get the Sapphire Preferred Instead of the Sapphire Reserve

AwardWallet receives compensation from advertising partners for links on the blog. Terms Apply to the offers listed on this page. The opinions expressed here are our own and have not been reviewed, provided, or approved by any bank advertiser. Here's our complete list of Advertisers.

The Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card and Chase Sapphire Reserve® are the flagship cards in Chase’s Ultimate Rewards lineup, featuring top travel perks and earning flexible rewards.

While the Sapphire Reserve offers premium benefits you won’t find on the Sapphire Preferred. It also carries a much higher annual fee—$550 per year as opposed to the $95 annual fee on the Sapphire Preferred.

Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card
Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card
Annual Fee$95
Welcome Bonus Earn 100,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $1,250 when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®.
Our #1 recommended beginners rewards card featuring an 100,000-point signup bonus after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. This card comes with great benefits and earns valuable Ultimate Rewards points.
  • Our best offer ever! Earn 100,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $1,250 when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®.
  • Enjoy new benefits such as a $50 annual Ultimate Rewards Hotel Credit, 5X points on travel purchased through Chase Ultimate Rewards®, 3X points on dining and 2X points on all other travel purchases, plus more.
  • Get 25% more value when you redeem for airfare, hotels, car rentals and cruises through Chase Ultimate Rewards®. For example, 100,000 points are worth $1,250 toward travel.
  • With Pay Yourself Back℠, your points are worth 25% more during the current offer when you redeem them for statement credits against existing purchases in select, rotating categories
  • Get unlimited deliveries with a $0 delivery fee and reduced service fees on eligible orders over $12 for a minimum of one year with DashPass, DoorDash's subscription service. Activate by 12/31/21.
  • Count on Trip Cancellation/Interruption Insurance, Auto Rental Collision Damage Waiver, Lost Luggage Insurance and more.
  • Get up to $60 back on an eligible Peloton Digital or All-Access Membership through 12/31/2021, and get full access to their workout library through the Peloton app, including cardio, running, strength, yoga, and more. Take classes using a phone, tablet, or TV. No fitness equipment is required.
  • 5X points on Lyft rides through March 2022
  • 5X points on travel purchased through Chase
  • 3X points on dining at restaurants worldwide
  • 3X points on eligible streaming services
  • 3X points on online grocery purchases (excluding Target, Walmart, and wholesale clubs)
  • 2X points on all other travel
  • 1X point per dollar spent on all other purchases

Sure, the Sapphire Reserve offers travel/dining credits and other perks that can effectively reduce the “net” annual fee. However, not everyone looking for a rewards card is going to need — or make full use of — travel/dining credits and benefits that come with a premium travel credit card.

There are plenty of scenarios where it makes sense to apply for the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card over a premium travel card like the Sapphire Reserve. In this post, we’ll touch on five of them.

100,000 vs. 60,000 Point Welcome Bonus

The welcome offer for these two cards should play a significant part in your calculation. Both cards are currently running increased signup bonuses, but it's really no contest. The Sapphire Preferred sports an offer of 100,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. The Sapphire Reserve offer is 60,000 after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening

That 40,000 point difference could be worth a round-trip flight with several of the Ultimate Rewards transfer partners. So, it’s definitely worth considering whether you want to sacrifice those extra points to get access to the more robust benefits of the Sapphire Reserve.

Under current rules, Chase won’t let you get the Sapphire Preferred if you already have the Sapphire Reserve — and vice versa. If you decide to start with the higher welcome bonus and lower annual fee, you should be able to upgrade in the future if you decide you want the extra benefits.

$95 vs. $550 in Fees Over the First 12 Months

The most obvious difference separating the Sapphire Preferred from the Sapphire Reserve is the annual fee. As a premium travel card, the Sapphire Reserve has a much higher annual fee than the Sapphire Preferred. After a recent fee increase, the difference is now a whopping $455 — or nearly 6 times as expensive.

Each and every year you hold these cards, you can expect to pay just $95 in annual fees for the Sapphire Preferred vs. $550 in annual fees for the Sapphire Reserve.

For the frequent traveler, perks like Priority Pass lounge access, a $300 annual travel credit, and the DoorDash dining credit can often justify the extra expense of the Sapphire Reserve. If you consistently use the travel and DoorDash credits, the difference between the two fees becomes much smaller. However, you still have to be comfortable with paying $550 upfront and trying to recover the value as you make travel purchases.

If you are just starting out in the points and miles space or you aren't 100% certain you'll be able to take advantage of the Sapphire Reserve‘s benefits, the Sapphire Preferred is the better card.

No Charge for Adding Authorized Users as Opposed to Paying for Them

For many cardholders, adding an authorized user to your credit card account is one of the first priorities after receiving the card. Adding family members as authorized users can give them access to the card’s benefits, double down on your ability to earn points, and help save money by providing access to premium benefits like primary rental insurance.

Chase Sapphire Preferred Card travel insurance benefits
Adding an authorized user to your Sapphire card covers them with some of the card's best benefits like Lost and Delayed Baggage Insurance

The two cards have vastly different policies in this respect. The Sapphire Preferred charges no fee for adding authorized user accounts. However, adding an authorized user to the Sapphire Reserve will come at a cost.

To put that in perspective: if you have one authorized user on your account, you'll still pay just $95 for the Sapphire Preferred. But the additional $75 for an authorized user account increases the yearly fees on the Sapphire Reserve to $625. That's a hefty fee—especially if you’re unsure you can take advantage of all the credits and benefits associated with the card.

One of the big benefits of adding an authorized user is earning points on purchases they make with the card. But you need to do the math to make sure your authorized user is spending enough to justify the annual fee. For example, to offset a $75 authorized user fee, you'd need to earn 5,000 extra points annually if you value each point at 1.5 cents. And that's before even factoring in opportunity cost.

Lower Income Threshold and Minimum Credit Limit Requirements

One of the keys to successful points/miles strategies is selecting products that suit your financial position. While Visa issues both the Sapphire cards, the Sapphire Preferred is a Visa Signature card, and the Sapphire Reserve is a Visa Infinite card. The two cards have different minimum income and credit limit requirements.

The official minimum credit limit for each card is:

  • Visa Signature – $5,000
  • Visa Infinite – $10,000

And while there is no publicly available formula for how banks decide on credit card approvals, logic would dictate that you will need to meet a higher income threshold to qualify for a $10,000 credit limit, particularly if you already have a line of credit with the same bank.

The Sapphire Preferred is a Great Card for Beginners

What makes the Sapphire Preferred so good for beginners? We are big believers in starting small; don't dive in headfirst. Learn from the available opportunities and potential mistakes while they are minor errors that won't cost a lot of money. You will make mistakes; we all do.

Award travel is no different from any other hobby. Over time, you'll become more knowledgeable on how to leverage points (and premium benefits) for maximum value. It can be a steep learning curve with the volume of information available.

The Sapphire Reserve is the better card if you can take advantage of the available travel credits and benefits while knowing how best to utilize the bonus categories on travel and dining. If there is any doubt that you will make full use of the benefits of the Sapphire Reserve, then the Sapphire Preferred is most likely the better option financially.

Final Thoughts

The ‘best’ card is entirely subjective and determined by your personal circumstances. It’s easy as someone that writes about points and miles for a living to sit here and catalog all the different ways you can maximize airline credits and travel benefits on premium cards.

But we also remember our first forays into points and miles. The fumbles and missteps, false assumptions, and the daunting volume of information. And that's why we think the Sapphire Preferred earns its spot as the best beginner's card and still deserves its place as one of the best travel cards on the market.

Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card
Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card
Annual Fee$95
Welcome Bonus Earn 100,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $1,250 when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®.
Our #1 recommended beginners rewards card featuring an 100,000-point signup bonus after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. This card comes with great benefits and earns valuable Ultimate Rewards points.
  • Our best offer ever! Earn 100,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $1,250 when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®.
  • Enjoy new benefits such as a $50 annual Ultimate Rewards Hotel Credit, 5X points on travel purchased through Chase Ultimate Rewards®, 3X points on dining and 2X points on all other travel purchases, plus more.
  • Get 25% more value when you redeem for airfare, hotels, car rentals and cruises through Chase Ultimate Rewards®. For example, 100,000 points are worth $1,250 toward travel.
  • With Pay Yourself Back℠, your points are worth 25% more during the current offer when you redeem them for statement credits against existing purchases in select, rotating categories
  • Get unlimited deliveries with a $0 delivery fee and reduced service fees on eligible orders over $12 for a minimum of one year with DashPass, DoorDash's subscription service. Activate by 12/31/21.
  • Count on Trip Cancellation/Interruption Insurance, Auto Rental Collision Damage Waiver, Lost Luggage Insurance and more.
  • Get up to $60 back on an eligible Peloton Digital or All-Access Membership through 12/31/2021, and get full access to their workout library through the Peloton app, including cardio, running, strength, yoga, and more. Take classes using a phone, tablet, or TV. No fitness equipment is required.
  • 5X points on Lyft rides through March 2022
  • 5X points on travel purchased through Chase
  • 3X points on dining at restaurants worldwide
  • 3X points on eligible streaming services
  • 3X points on online grocery purchases (excluding Target, Walmart, and wholesale clubs)
  • 2X points on all other travel
  • 1X point per dollar spent on all other purchases
AwardWallet Tip of The Day
Did you know that you can group different travel segments into a single travel plan? You can then share this trip with anyone. To do this use the Create Travel Plan link.  You can move the beginning and end sections of the travel plan by dragging and dropping.
Show me how

The comments on this page are not provided, reviewed, or otherwise approved by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser's responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

**You may receive 5 bonus AAdvantage miles for leaving a comment (Details/FAQ)

Comments

  • Harvey Kwan says:

    Pair it with a CFU or CFF and you’ll have lots of UR in no time.

  • I got the reserve back in 2016 when the offer was for 100,000 UR points. The lounge access saved me a lot of money in the airports. At that time, after the travel credits, I’d have to make up $150 worth of expenses. I think I did that with the lounge access. But now it’s $250 that I have to make up. So wondering if it’s worth it anymore.

  • I hear people say get the CSP first and then upgrade after a year to the CSR. When you upgrade do you cancel and reapply to get the signup bonus? Or will doing a product change upgrade give you the bonus too?

    • You generally can’t get a bonus when changing products. If you want to cancel and re-apply, you need to wait 48 months from the date you received the previous “Sapphire bonus”. So you won’t be able to earn more than one bonus in a short period of time, but you can start with the CSP and then decide whether it makes sense to upgrade.

  • Always waivered between the two cards but got the preferred. Will have to reconsider based on what I think I will get the most out of in terms of travel as we see what opens up more in the future.

  • Would like chase to increase benefits for the reserve to make it more competitive with other premium cards!

  • I just really can’t ever see myself in a position to justify a $550 fee for a card

    • David Miller says:

      It’s a lot of money. But if you travel a lot, it could make sense. The first $300 you spend on travel or dining is refunded to you, so that effectively brings the cost down to $250. Included with the card is access to airport lounges, which would cost over a hundred if you were to buy it separately. And then you earn more points with the Reserve – like 3X on dining and travel, compared to 1X with Preferred. If you know how you’ll use it and do the math, it could be worth it.

    • Do look at it more than just a $550 fee. $300 gets taken off the top and you receive other benefits like Priority Pass as well as intangibles like status with National car rental etc. You have to evaluate your situation and see if it makes sense. I’d argue if you travel a lot, absolutely. If you don’t travel much at all, of course not. And there’s a grey area in between the two that could be a yes or a no.

  • One thing I like about Chase cards is the ability to pay my bill at a local Chase ATM with cash. I don’t have that option for Citi.

  • Chase does have great products and offers. I wish the other Banks were more competitive.

  • Only when the sapphire preferred has a larger sign up bonus

  • Shame that I can’t get the bonus again; I find that having had the CSP for awhile that it’s not a great value for anything other than travel, especially since the CSP now has 3% on dining.

  • Wouldn’t utilize the perks offered on the preferred card enough to justify the additional annual fee… 100K for the reserve is a great offer … had signed up for a previous 80k offer so obviously I can’t part in the new promotion

  • Lillian Dikovitsky says:

    I have had the Reserve for over 4 years. I just used Pay Yourself Back to use up all my UR. Spending the last few DoorDash credits I have and then will be closing and hope to reapply and get the Preferred card.

  • I think the 100 k offer itself is more than sufficient to get the SP, even if you eventually want the SR for the long term (which is somewhat debatable given the increased fee ).

  • Between the MUCH larger signup bonus and the MUCH lower annual fee, the Sapphire Preferred is an excellent choice for most people who don’t need or can’t really use the Reserve perks to full advantage. Throw in the Primary car rental insurance and the Sapphire Preferred is a real winner with the 100K sign on bonus.

  • Such a shame the CSR is $550. I’d sign up for it again at $450 but $550 was too much and pushed me over the edge.

  • With the Preferred always having a higher sign up offer than the Reserve, I ALWAYS say that people should just get the Preferred and then upgrade after getting the bonus if they want the Reserve.

    • It really depends. If you can take advantage of Priority Pass like eating at restaurants, that can cover the extra $150 real fast.

  • Looks like there are quite a few reasons to choose the Prefered card over the reserve one.

  • I had my kids first credit card out of college be the Sapphire Preferred. Good card for beginners with low annual fee.

  • Agree that it’s hard to justify the high annual fee for Sapphire Reserve.

  • With similar reason, I much prefer Citi premier card to Citi prestige. Recently never approved for Chase case due to 5/24 rule.

  • I love that you guys take the time to link to prior posts. Just as I’m thinking to myself that I need to figure out what makes the Sapphire Preferred such a great card for beginners OH LOOK A LINKED POST ON WHY THE SAPPHIRE PREFERRED IS A GREAT CARD FOR BEGINNERS! Honestly, it’s the little details that make it that much easier for beginners to begin navigating the world of points and miles. These little touches do not go unnoticed and are very much appreciated!

  • Juan Manuel Villa says:

    Its look like they trying to go against the Reserve Card, more perks but a higher annual fee and aditional fees per each card.

  • The benefits and earning structure on the Reserve need to be improved. Otherwise, for many people, the Preferred is indeed the better value card to hold.

  • Days after I signed up for the CSP 60,000 offer, the 80,000 went live. Chase declined my request to recive the 80,000 offer. Has anyone had success getting them to provide the increased bonus? Is there any sense in calling again in a few weeks?

    • I’d definitely recommend checking back in a couple of weeks. From what I understand, it takes a bit before they empower agents to match to the higher bonus (or clearly indicate that they aren’t matching)

    • Fenspinbi says:

      I had the same issue with the Freedom Unlimited, which came with the 5x back on groceries for the 1st year bonus last summer shortly after I got the card, and Chase told me “sorry, next time”, and refused to match. I got the CSP with the 60k last May as well, so I’m SOL on multiple levels on all these elevated Chase offers. I did get the Amex Platinum AND Hilton Honors 100k+ offers, so all isn’t lost.

  • Scott Driesen says:

    We have one of each card & the ability to transfer points from one to the other has come in handy often.
    Always wonder if there’s a better strategy for it that what we are currently doing?

  • Another reason which was just announced: increased grocery payout on the CSR (3x pts vs 2x on the CSP), from 11/1-4/30.

  • Tomas Alvarez says:

    Totally agree. 5 reasons are true.
    I still love the Reserve

  • I’ve read that both sapphire cards will now earn 3 points per dollar for groceries. That’s a real improvement.

  • The CSP was my first true “travel” card, and I discovered this hobby in the age of COVID. The CSR won’t make financial sense until the 48 month waiting period for the bonus has elapsed (and we’ve put a lid on the pandemic), but I’m definitely looking forward to the anticipated changes to the entire Sapphire lineup, given the positive changes on the Freedom cards.

  • I still love the Reserve…

    Unfortunately it’s difficult to travel these days!

  • David Miller says:

    I’ve had the Reserve for a few years now and always thought it was worth the $450 because I really used the benefits, like the lounges. But I just dropped down to a Preferred because I don’t see myself traveling for a while and when I do, I’ve heard you can just pay something like $27 per session to get into a lounge. Is that true? And fortunately I never needed to find out for myself how the “primary” rental car insurance works, but I read somebody’s comment that Chase was useless after her accident, and she had to cough up $3700 to pay the rental company, and wishes she’d just bought the dang CDW. Because of those reasons, I hope I made the right choice to switch to CSP. Thoughts?

    • Interesting! I’ve only heard good things from Chase’s rental car coverage, but thankfully I also haven’t needed to use it myself. In your case, the CSP offers the same rental car protection as the CSR.

      As far as the $27 cost for the lounge, that’s generally the cost to bring in an additional guest above your guest allowance. The cost typically isn’t that cheap as a standalone. We’ve found that LoungeBuddy is the best resource for finding lounges and their cost.

  • @Jess, I’ve read that Chase may use my income data from a current Chase card application with them to reduce my credit limits on other existing Chase cards I own. I assume that could happen if my income on a current Chase application is less than the income on a prior application. I’ve retired since my last Chase application; consequently, I no longer have employer income. However, my 401k and IRA provide enough income to live on for my retirement. Further, IRS certainly treats my 401k and IRA withdrawals as income. Would Chase see my retirement withdrawals as income? Or, by applying for a new card, might I risk losing some of my credit limit on my existing Chase cards?

    • I haven’t heard of Chase reducing your credit limit on existing cards after a new application. However, I understand that Chase determines how much total credit to extend to you based on your current income. So, if you already have cards with more credit limit than that, you wouldn’t be approved. My wife and I have learned from experience that you can end up getting a Chase card approved by calling into the reconsideration line to reduce the credit lines on your existing Chase cards to transfer enough credit to open the new card.

      As far as what counts as income, Chase gives you the chance to state all available income available to you – which should include your 401k and IRA. If you are withdrawing from a ROTH account, you may need to clarify on your application that you have non-taxable income.

  • Steven William Van Meter says:

    I signed up for this after a recent flight. The bonus points will surely help me make a flight to somewhere desirable once these silly lockdowns and border closures are over.

  • After you take out the travel credit the still $450 reserve is only $150 versus the $90. A few visits to priorty pass lounges or restaurants makes up for that alone. With the extra $100 next year it becomes a bit more of a comparison.

    • Agreed completely. While us existing cardholders may be able to easily justify the ~$50 difference, new CSR cardholders are charged the full $550 annual fee now. So, it’s a lot harder to justify picking the CSR instead of the CSP at this time.

  • Many of the benefits are rendered useless for the rest of 2020.

  • It would be great if you’d update this article to reflect Chase’s recent introduction of new benefits and perqs and rewards categories.

    • We intend for this post to be an evergreen post and most of the new benefits and perks offered by Chase are temporary in nature. With that said, is there a particular permanent perk you think we should include? Thanks!

  • But for those of us who already own the Sapphire Reserve, I’m wondering if I’m getting my worth of the CSR this year. I mostly reside abroad so can’t make use of the Doordash benefit nor the Lyft rides. I have had this card for 3 years now and LOVE the PriorityPass feature most of all. But not getting to use much of that. And the lounges are scaled down these days. I’ve already gotten a huge benefit from it over the years so the long term perspective value is still enough for me to keep it. But I wonder for others.

  • Since I’m not travelling so much right now, I think my best choice would be a 3rd option: The Chase Flex card.

  • I wish they’d add some additional benefits to the CSP to better compare to the Freedom cards, other than just the welcome bonus. I already have the card so that does nothing for me 🙂 Maybe a return of the 7% annual bonus. At the very least, they should add a drugstore bonus.

  • If I were a newbie at this game, I’d definitely apply for the Preferred to get the larger sign on bonus then later upgrade to the Reserve. I wish the bonus had been this large when I got the card. I still travel a lot, so the higher points earning and redemption rate for the Reserve still make it worth the annual fee. I recently booked a hotel in a small mountain town that had no chain hotels so no points or status to be gained) I booked it through the Chase portal and really appreciated the 1.5 c redemption rate.

  • Is there an end date to the 80,000 points? I’m going to get my wife to sign up for it.

    • Hi Darren, no end date has been officially announced. For what it’s worth, I’ve seen refer-a-friend links that show 11/7/20 as the deadline. This info hasn’t been reviewed or confirmed in any way by Chase.

  • After meeting the minimum spend on the Chase Sapphire preferred and getting the bonus how long would Chase make you wait before upgrading to the Chase Sapphire reserve?

    • Hey Ed, that’s a good question. I’ve seen multiple references to 13 months as the minimum waiting period, but I didn’t come across anything official from Chase.

    • You can’t upgrade to a card with a larger annual fee for at least 12 months. Many card issuers further restrict the law to be no product changing at all within 12 months.

  • Carl Vartian says:

    PLEASE take a look at when some of these comments were posted.

    Lots of (currently) nonsensical comments about those who travel a lot. Note these were all posted before COVID-19 became a household word.

    No one is now traveling a lot internationally and, if they say they are, they are probably lying.

    Many countries have arriving Americans in quarantine for 14 days, so I truly doubt anyone is really capitalizing on accrued points.

    Like many others, I am saving up for when travel opens up, but not sure when that will actually be.

  • Wondering if anyone can shed some light on the PP benefits of this card vs. the Citi Prestige? I’m looking to downgrade my Prestige as the travel partners aren’t worth it for me and I can’t justify spending the AF on Prestige as they slashed most of the benefits that I used.

    As travel has diminished a lot for me (most is work travel but that is VERY restricted now), I couldn’t find an up-to-date guide on the PP benefits for each card.

    Can anyone shed some light? Definitely keeping the CSR, but didn’t know what the differences between the PP memberships for the cards as they both differ somewhat.

    TIA!

    • Here’s the link to the Guide to Benefits from my wife’s Citi Premier card: https://www.cardbenefits.citi.com/~/media/CPP/Files/LegalDocs/SOAPI/MV6703-0415_CitiTravelFee_p-J3.ashx
      And here’s the Citi Prestige as well: https://www.cardbenefits.citi.com/~/media/CPP/Files/LegalDocs/SOAPI/141901_MV6704_Prestige_Updates_3_FINAL.ashx
      Just a heads up that both links will download a PDF.

      {edit} and here’s the Guide to Benefits for the CSR: https://www.chasebenefits.com/sapphirereserve2

      Also, now that I understand PP as Priority Pass (instead of Purchase Protection)…
      – CSR: Priority PassTM Select Membership…Primary Cardmembers and Authorized Users are granted complimentary access to the Priority Pass lounges and are allowed a maximum of two accompanying guests each. For any additional guests, your card will be charged $27 per guest, per visit.
      – Prestige: Priority Pass Select Lounge Access Terms and Conditions. Primary and Authorized users are granted complimentary access to the Priority Pass lounges and allowed a maximum of up to two guests or and immediate family members (spouse, domestic partner and/or children under 18 years of age). Any additional guests will be charged a $27 per guest, per visit charge.

      So, it looks like the Prestige has a slight advantage if you travel with a large immediate family.

      • I have the same question — I see a Citi Premier and Citi Prestige though. I think he asked about Chase Sapphire Reserve vs. Citi Prestige.

        I’m canceling the Prestige as well and couldn’t find any differences between the two (Prestige vs. CSR) but maybe I’m missing something?

        • Shoot. You’re right. That’s what I get for rushing. I edited my original response to fix. Thanks for flagging.

          • Thanks (and thanks, Jen!) Yes… what I had meant was the CSR vs. Citi Prestige.

            Appreciate the link to the docs!!

  • Chase definitely has better transfer options (in my opinion). Although, the Citi DC is appealing for a straight cash back card. With travel being severely limited, I’ve thought about keeping the CSR, but moving most spend to the Citi DC just for the unlimited cash back at 2%.

  • Excellent article. I would advise explore all your credit card options before making a decision.

  • Bruce klein says:

    Already have the sapphire reserve and have points already earned. Is there any way to cancel and keep lints and then apply for the sapphire preferred card?

    • Rather than canceling the CSR, I’d recommend downgrading the card to a Freedom Flex or Freedom Unlimited. That way you won’t risk losing the points. Then, after you get the Chase Sapphire Preferred, you can use the “combine points” feature to move those points from your Freedom card to your new CSP card.

  • 80k points is a rare offer, hard to say No to apply for.

  • I didn’t see where you contrasted the points redemption value. Are they both $.015 per point?

    • They aren’t. That’s one way that the Chase Sapphire Reserve still holds the edge. CSR cardholders get 1.5 cents per point for travel booked through the Chase Travel Portal and through Pay Yourself Back. Chase Sapphire Preferred cardholders only get 1.25 cents per point.